December 1926

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The following events occurred in December 1926:

December 1, 1926 (Wednesday)

December 2, 1926 (Thursday)

December 3, 1926 (Friday)

December 4, 1926 (Saturday)

December 5, 1926 (Sunday)

December 6, 1926 (Monday)

December 7, 1926 (Tuesday)

  • U.S. President Calvin Coolidge made his fourth State of the Union address to Congress. "In reporting to the Congress the state of the Union, I find it impossible to characterize it other than one of general peace and prosperity", he began.[13] One of the items he called for was new legislation of the radio, which led to the Radio Act of 1927.[14] Coolidge also reminded listeners that Prohibition was "the law of the land" and urged its enforcement, saying, "Some people do not like the amendment, some do not like other parts of the Constitution, some do not like any of it. Those who entertain such sentiments have a perfect right to seek through legal methods for a change. But for any of our inhabitants to observe such parts of the Constitution as they like, while disregarding others, is a doctrine that would break down all protection of life and property and destroy the American system of ordered liberty."[13]
  • Carmi Thompson, leader of a commission to survey the condition of the Philippines, recommended the postponement of independence.[10]
  • The Council for the Preservation of Rural England (CPRE, now the Campaign to Protect Rural England) was founded.

December 8, 1926 (Wednesday)

  • The Calles government of Mexico recognized the Nicaraguan rebel government of Juan Bautista Sacasa and not President Adolfo Díaz as the legitimate government of Nicaragua, putting it at odds with the United States.[15]

December 9, 1926 (Thursday)

December 10, 1926 (Friday)

December 11, 1926 (Saturday)

December 12, 1926 (Sunday)

  • The Italian Socialist Filippo Turati completed a dramatic overnight journey by motorboat to Corsica, escaping the Fascists who had restricted his movements under the country's new confinement laws. Turati's escape to France was aided by Carlo Rosselli, Ferruccio Parri and future Italian President Sandro Pertini.[22]
  • Irvington, New Jersey invoked the state's blue law from 1854 to arrest 95 people for doing business on the Sabbath. An organization of ten local ministers was behind the push for enforcement.[23]

December 13, 1926 (Monday)

December 14, 1926 (Tuesday)

  • Agatha Christie, missing for 11 days, was found at a spa in Harrogate. Her husband Archie issued a statement claiming she had been suffering from amnesia.[7]
  • A specially prepared phonograph record was played over WGN radio in Chicago, in which Benito Mussolini addressed the American people in the first recording ever made of his voice. The nine-minute address was in Italian and then announcer Bill Hay read an English translation after the recording was finished. Mussolini stated that he felt "the heartiest friendship" for the United States, that he was a "sincere admirer" of American civilization, and that Italian-Americans were "a complete example of the fusion of the two civilizations, a wonderful and profitable treaty of union. So is built an indissoluble relation of cordiality, friendship, and collaboration. The two lands will, I am convinced, travel a long road together."[24]

December 15, 1926 (Wednesday)

  • Roman Catholic clergy in the United States issued a collective pastoral letter condemning the ongoing persecution of Catholics in Mexico.[25]

December 16, 1926 (Thursday)

December 17, 1926 (Friday)

December 18, 1926 (Saturday)

December 19, 1926 (Sunday)

  • The Condé Diamond, stolen in October, was recovered in Paris when a hotel chambermaid bit into an apple left in the room and found it contained the stolen gem. She took it to authorities and several arrests were made.[30]

December 20, 1926 (Monday)

December 21, 1926 (Tuesday)

December 22, 1926 (Wednesday)

  • The government of Romania introduced a bill that would make it a crime for anyone to send out news offending the King, Queen or Crown Prince. The punishment would be four years in prison and a $100 fine.[33]
  • Born: Alcides Ghiggia, footballer, in Montevideo

December 23, 1926 (Thursday)

December 24, 1926 (Friday)

  • Nicaraguan President Adolfo Díaz survived an assassination attempt when two men charged at him with machetes as he was entering his cab.[35]
  • Died: Johan Castberg, 64, Norwegian Radical politician

December 25, 1926 (Saturday)

December 26, 1926 (Sunday)

December 27, 1926 (Monday)

December 28, 1926 (Tuesday)

December 29, 1926 (Wednesday)

  • District Attorney Asa Keyes announced that the Aimee Semple McPherson trial would not go forward and that the charges against her of faking her kidnapping story would be dropped. "Dismissal of charges is necessary because of the impossibility of conviction in the present state of the case", Keyes stated.[42]
  • Died: Rainer Maria Rilke, 51, Austrian poet

December 30, 1926 (Thursday)

December 31, 1926 (Friday)

References

  1. ^ "Ontario Votes Out Dry Law". Chicago Daily Tribune. December 2, 1926. p. 1.
  2. ^ "Charlie Chaplin and Wife Part". Chicago Daily Tribune. December 2, 1926. p. 1.
  3. ^ Dailey, Charles (December 3, 1926). "List Dr. Sun's Widow to Be China's Ruler". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  4. ^ Gu, Sharron (2009). Law and Politics in Modern China: Under the Law, the Law, and Above the Law. Amherst, New York: Cambria Press. p. 85. ISBN 1-60497-604-7.
  5. ^ a b c d Mercer, Derrik (1989). Chronicle of the 20th Century. London: Chronicle Communications Ltd. p. 348. ISBN 978-0-582-03919-3.
  6. ^ Kingham, Alec (September 15, 2010). "Agatha Christie and a real life Shere murder mystery". Surrey Life. Retrieved January 3, 2015.
  7. ^ a b Mahon, Elizabeth Kerri (May 12, 2011). "The Mysterious Disappearance of Agatha Christie". Criminal Element. Retrieved January 3, 2015.
  8. ^ Eckershall, Walter (December 4, 1926). "Walker Wrests Title From Flowers". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 21.
  9. ^ "Marie Misses Yanks' Cheers in Roumania". Chicago Daily Tribune. December 5, 1926. p. 1.
  10. ^ a b "Chronology 1926". indiana.edu. 2002. Retrieved January 3, 2015.
  11. ^ "Europe's Peace Hopes Snagged on Rhine Army". Chicago Daily Tribune. December 6, 1926. p. 1.
  12. ^ Clayton, John (December 7, 1926). "Marry or Pay Tax, Mussolini to Bachelors". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 1.
  13. ^ a b Woolley, John; Peters, Gerhard. "Fourth Annual Message". The American Presidency Project. Retrieved January 3, 2015.
  14. ^ Sidak, Gregory J. (1997). Foreign Investment in American Telecommunications. University of Chicago Press. p. 57. ISBN 0-226-75626-2.
  15. ^ "Mexico Leads Latin States Against U.S.". Chicago Daily Tribune. December 9, 1926. p. 1.
  16. ^ Yanow, Scott (2003). Jazz on Record: The First Sixty Years. Berkeley: Backbeat Books. p. 72. ISBN 0-87930-755-2.
  17. ^ "Recordings made Thursday, December 9, 1926". Discography of American Historical Recordings. Retrieved January 3, 2015.
  18. ^ "The Nobel Peace Prize 1926". Nobelprize.org. Retrieved January 3, 2015.
  19. ^ "The Nobel Peace Prize 1925". Nobelprize.org. Retrieved January 3, 2015.
  20. ^ "Allied-German Chiefs Hope for Arms Pact Today". Chicago Daily Tribune. December 12, 1926. p. 4.
  21. ^ Jäckel, Eberhard (1981). Hitler's World View: A Blueprint for Power. Harvard College. p. 36. ISBN 0-674-40425-4.
  22. ^ "Associazione Nazionale Sandro Pertini". Retrieved January 3, 2015.
  23. ^ "Invoke Blue Law of 1854 to Close New Jersey City". Chicago Daily Tribune. December 13, 1926. p. 5.
  24. ^ "Duce Greets America Over W-G-N Radio". Chicago Daily Tribune. December 15, 1926. pp. 1, 12.
  25. ^ Henning, Arthur Sears (December 16, 1926). "U.S. Bishops Join in Pastoral Note Against Mexico". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 4.
  26. ^ "Pin War Plot on German Cabinet; Demand it Quit". Chicago Daily Tribune. December 17, 1926. p. 18.
  27. ^ Schultz, Sigrid (December 18, 1926). "German Cabinet Quits; Beaten by Reichstag Vote". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 5.
  28. ^ Hirsch, Francine (2005). Empire of Nations: Ethnographic Knowledge and the Making of the Soviet Union. Cornell University. p. 124. ISBN 0-8014-8908-3.
  29. ^ Bowman, John Stewart, ed. (2000). Columbia Chronologies of Asian History and Culture. Columbia University Press. p. 62. ISBN 0-231-11004-9.
  30. ^ "Famous Diamond Found by Servant". Montreal Gazette. Montreal: 1. December 21, 1926.
  31. ^ Forrester, Wade (December 20, 2010). "December 20, 1926: Hornsby for Frisch". On This Day in Cardinal Nation. Retrieved January 3, 2015.
  32. ^ "Landis Bares Baseball Plot". Chicago Daily Tribune. December 22, 1926. p. 1.
  33. ^ Goldstein, Robert Justin, ed. (2001). Political Censorship. Chicago and London: Fitzroy Dearborn. pp. 97–98. ISBN 1-57958-320-2.
  34. ^ "Nicaragua (1909–present)". University of Central Arkansas. Retrieved January 3, 2015.
  35. ^ a b "U.S. Troops Take 2 Nicaraguan Ports". Chicago Daily Tribune. December 24, 1926. p. 1.
  36. ^ "Hirohito Takes Japan's Throne as Father Dies". Chicago Daily Tribune. December 25, 1926. p. 1.
  37. ^ "Floods Drive 2,000 from Their Homes". Chicago Daily Tribune. December 27, 1926. p. 1.
  38. ^ "New Emperor of Japan Promises Reign of Peace". Chicago Daily Tribune. December 29, 1926. p. 2.
  39. ^ Sengupta, Arunabha (December 28, 2013). "When Australian legend Bill Ponsford scored a triple; Victoria amassed 1,107 against New South Wales". The Cricket Country. Retrieved January 3, 2015.
  40. ^ "Movement Activist." Independence Hall. The Independence Hall of Korea, n.d. Web. January xx, 2015.
  41. ^ Jonny El. "Patriot Na Sok-Chu." 24 Oct 2009. Online image. Flickr. January 3, 2015. https://www.flickr.com/photos/jonlawrence/4038173953/in/set-72157622519941597
  42. ^ "Aimee Will Be Freed of Plot Charge". Chicago Daily Tribune. December 30, 1926. p. 1.
  43. ^ Martin, Gerald (December 31, 1926). "Rebel Armies Trap Ward of U.S. in Nicaragua". Chicago Daily Tribune. p. 8.
  44. ^ "Spanish King Pardons Rebels as New Year's Gift". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 1, 1927. p. 3.
  45. ^ "Dog Has Soul, Say France's "Immortals"". Chicago Daily Tribune. January 1, 1927. p. 1.