List of Chief Ministers of Maharashtra

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
  (Redirected from Chief Minister of Maharashtra)
Jump to navigation Jump to search

Chief Minister of Maharashtra
Seal of Maharashtra.png
Devendra Fadnavis Official Photo.jpg
Incumbent
Devendra Fadnavis

since 31 October 2014
StyleThe Honourable
StatusHead of Government
AbbreviationCM
Member ofMaharashtra Legislature (Assembly/Council)
Cabinet
ResidenceVarsha bungalow, Malabar Hill, Mumbai
SeatMantralaya, Mumbai
AppointerGovernor of Maharashtra
constitutionally; based on the appointee's ability to command confidence in the House
Term lengthFive years
PrecursorChief Minister of Bombay State
Inaugural holderYashwantrao Chavan (1960-1962)
Formation1 May 1960; 58 years ago (1960-05-01)
DeputyDeputy Chief Minister of Maharashtra
WebsiteCMO Maharashtra

The Chief Minister of Maharashtra is the head of the Government of the western Indian state of Maharashtra. Following elections to the Legislative Assembly, the Governor invites the party (or coalition) with a majority of seats to form the government and appoints the Chief Minister (CM). If the appointee is not a member of either the Legislative Assembly or the Legislative Council of Maharashtra, then the Constitution stipulates that they need to be elected within six months of being sworn-in.[1] The office of the CM is coterminous with the concurrent Assembly provided the CM commands confidence in the house and hence does not exceed five years. However, it is subject to no term limits.[2]

Maharashtra was formed by dissolution of Bombay State on 1 May 1960.[3] Yashwantrao Chavan, who was serving as the third CM of Bombay State since 1956, became the first CM of Maharashtra. He belonged to the Indian National Congress and held the office until the 1962 Assembly elections. Marotrao Kannanwar succeeded him and was the only CM to die while in office.[4][5] Vasantrao Naik, who was in office from December 1963 to February 1975 for more than 11 years, has by far been the longest serving CM. He also was the first and only CM to complete his full term of five years (1967-1972). With the exceptions of Manohar Joshi (Shiv Sena), Narayan Rane (Shiv Sena) and Devendra Fadnavis (Bharatiya Janata Party), all other CMs have been from the Congress or its breakaway parties.[6][7][8] So far, President's rule has been imposed twice in the state: first from February to June 1980 and again from September to October 2014.[9][10] Devendra Fadnavis is the incumbent CM since 31 October 2014, the first from the BJP.[11]

Colour key for political parties

Chief Ministers of Bombay State

No Name

(birth-death)

Portrait Party Term of office Assembly constituency
Took office Left office Duration
Chief Ministers of Bombay State [a]
1 B. G. Kher
(1888-1957)
- Indian National Congress 15 August 1947 21 April 1952 4 years, 250 days
2 Morarji Desai
(1896-1995)
Morarji Desai (portrait).png
21 April 1952 31 October 1956 4 years, 193 days Bulsar Chikhli
Chief Ministers of Bombay State (after the States Reorganisation Act, 1956) [b]
3 Yashwantrao Chavan
(1913-1984)
Y B Chavan (cropped).jpg
Indian National Congress 1 November 1956 5 April 1957 3 years, 181 days Karad North
5 April 1957 30 April 1960

Chief Ministers of Maharashtra[c]

No Name

(birth-death)

Portrait Party

(Alliance)[7]

Term of office Assembly constituency Assembly
Took office Left office Duration
1 Yashwantrao Chavan
(1913-1984)
Y B Chavan (cropped).jpg
Indian National Congress 1 May 1960 19 November 1962 2 years, 202 days Karad North 1st
2 Marotrao Kannamwar
(1900-1963)
- 20 November 1962 24 November 1963 1 year, 4 days Saoli 2nd
3 P. K. Sawant - 25 November 1963 4 December 1963 9 days Chiplun
4 Vasantrao Naik
(1913-1979)
- 5 December 1963 1 March 1967 11 years, 77 days Pusad
1 March 1967 13 March 1972 3rd
13 March 1972 20 February 1975 4th
5 Shankarrao Chavan
(1920-2004)
- 21 February 1975 16 May 1977 2 years, 84 days
(of 4 years, 190 days)
Bhokar
6 Vasantdada Patil

(1917-1989)

Vasantdada Patil (1977).jpg
17 May 1977 5 March 1978 1 year, 62 days
(of 3 years, 181 day)
Member of the

Maharashtra Legislative Council[14]

Indian National Congress

(Urs)[15][16]

(Congress (I) - Congress (U))

5 March 1978 18 July 1978 Sangli 5th
7 Sharad Pawar
(born 1940)
Sharad Pawar, Minister of AgricultureCrop.jpg
Indian National Congress

(Socialist)[17][18]

(Progressive Democratic Front)

18 July 1978 17 February 1980 1 year, 214 days
(of 6 years, 221 days)
Baramati
Vacant[d]
(President's rule)
- N/A 17 February 1980 8 June 1980 112 days N/A Dissolved[20]
8 Abdul Rehman Antulay
(1929-2014)
- Indian National Congress 9 June 1980 12 January 1982 1 year, 217 days Shrivardhan 6th
9 Babasaheb Bhosale
(1921-2007)
- 21 January 1982 1 February 1983 1 year, 11 days Nehrunagar
(6) Vasantdada Patil [3]

(1917-1989)

Vasantdada Patil (1977).jpg
2 February 1983 1 June 1985 2 years, 119 days
(of 3 years, 181 day)
Sangli[21]

(After winning the by-elections on 3 July 1983)

10 Shivajirao Patil Nilangekar
(born 1931)
- 3 June 1985 6 March 1986 276 days Nilanga 7th
(5) Shankarrao Chavan [2]

(1920-2004)

- 12 March 1986 26 June 1988 2 years, 106 days
(of 4 years, 190 days)
Member of the

Maharashtra Legislative Council[22]

(7) Sharad Pawar [2]
(born 1940)
Sharad Pawar, Minister of AgricultureCrop.jpg
26 June 1988 3 March 1990 2 years, 364 days
(of 6 years, 221 days)
Baramati
4 March 1990 25 June 1991 8th
11 Sudhakarrao Naik
(1934-2001)
- 25 June 1991 22 February 1993 1 year, 242 days Pusad
(7) Sharad Pawar [3]

(born 1940)

Sharad Pawar, Minister of AgricultureCrop.jpg
6 March 1993 14 March 1995 2 years, 8 days
(of 6 years, 221 days)
Baramati
12 Manohar Joshi
(born 1937)
Manohar Joshi cropped.jpg
Shiv Sena

(Sena-BJP)

14 March 1995 31 January 1999 3 years, 323 days Dadar 9th
13 Narayan Rane
(born 1952)
Narayan Rane.jpg
1 February 1999 17 October 1999 258 days Malvan
14 Vilasrao Deshmukh
(1945-2012)
Vilasrao Deshmukh at Innovation Partnerships Event May 8, 2012.jpg
Indian National Congress

(Congress-NCP)

18 October 1999 16 January 2003 3 years, 90 days
(of 7 years, 123 days)
Latur City 10th
15 Sushilkumar Shinde

(born 1941)

Sushilkumar Shinde.JPG
18 January 2003 30 October 2004 1 year, 286 days Solapur South[23]

(After winning the by-elections on 24 May 2003)

(14) Vilasrao Deshmukh [2]
(1945-2012)
Vilasrao Deshmukh at Innovation Partnerships Event May 8, 2012.jpg
1 November 2004 4 December 2008 4 years, 33 days
(of 7 years, 123 days)
Latur City 11th
16 Ashok Chavan
(born 1958)
Ashok Chavan 2010 - still 114915 crop.jpg
8 December 2008 15 October 2009 1 year, 336 days Bhokar
7 November 2009 9 November 2010 12th
17 Prithviraj Chavan
(born 1946)
Prithviraj Chavan - India Economic Summit 2011.jpg
11 November 2010 26 September 2014 3 years, 319 days Member of the

Maharashtra Legislative Council[24][25]

Vacant[d]
(President's rule)
- N/A 28 September 2014[26] 30 October 2014[27] 32 days N/A
18 Devendra Fadnavis
(born 1970)
Devendra Fadnavis Official Photo.jpg
Bharatiya Janata Party

(NDA)

31 October 2014 Incumbent 4 years, 6 days Nagpur South West 13th

Explanatory notes

  1. ^ After India's Independence, Bombay State was created and its territory underwent constant change in the following years. It comprised Bombay Presidency (roughly equating to the present-day Indian state of Maharashtra, excluding South Maharashtra and Vidarbha), the princely states of the Baroda, Western India and Gujarat (the present-day Indian state of Gujarat) and Deccan States (which included parts of the present-day Indian states of Maharashtra and Karnataka).[12]
  2. ^ States Reorganisation Act, 1956: Bombay State was enlarged by the addition of Saurashtra State and Kutch State, the Marathi-speaking districts of Nagpur Division of Madhya Pradesh and Marathwada region of Hyderabad State. The southernmost districts of the Bombay Presidency were transferred to Mysore State.[13]
  3. ^ Bombay state was dissolved to form the present-day states of Maharashtra and Gujarat by the Bombay Reorganisation Act, 1960, which was enacted by the Parliament of India on 25 April 1960 and came into effect on 1 May 1960. [3]
  4. ^ a b Under Article 356 of the Constitution of India, in the event that a state government is unable to function according to constitutional provisions, the Central government can take direct control of the state machinery through the Governor. When President's rule is in force in a state, its council of ministers stands dissolved. The office of chief minister thus lies vacant. At times, the legislative assembly also stands dissolved.[19]

See also

References

  1. ^ "Chavan elected to Legislative Council". @businessline. Retrieved 2018-05-22.
  2. ^ Durga Das Basu. Introduction to the Constitution of India. 1960. 20th Edition, 2011 Reprint. pp. 241, 245. LexisNexis Butterworths Wadhwa Nagpur. ISBN 978-81-8038-559-9. Note: although the text talks about Indian state governments in general, it applies for the specific case of Maharashtra as well.
  3. ^ a b "The Bombay Reorganisation Act, 1960" (PDF). India Code - Digital Repository of Legislation. 1960-04-25.
  4. ^ "Before Jayalalithaa, 16 chief ministers who died in office". The Indian Express. 2016-12-07. Retrieved 2018-05-22.
  5. ^ "Jayalalithaa is dead: Here are other chief ministers who died while still in office - Firstpost". www.firstpost.com. Retrieved 2018-05-22.
  6. ^ "Down but not out". The Telegraph India. 2011-07-10.
  7. ^ a b Palshikar, Suhas; Birmal, Nitin; Ghotale, Vivek (2010). "Coalitions in Maharashtra Political fragmentation or Social Reconfiguration?" (PDF). Savitribai Phule Pune University.
  8. ^ "Indira Gandhi installed as president of break-away faction of Congress Party". India Today. Retrieved 2018-05-22.
  9. ^ "Use of President's Rule peaked on February 17, 1980: Some facts". India Today. 17 February 2016. Retrieved 1 March 2018.
  10. ^ "President's rule: 'Unprecedented but logical'". @businessline. Retrieved 1 March 2018.
  11. ^ Ananth, Venkat (28 October 2014). "A brief history of Maharashtra's chief ministers". livemint.com/. Retrieved 9 October 2017.
  12. ^ Desai, S. H. (1972). A critical study of the development of secondary education for girls in Gujarat its history and present day problems (PhD Thesis). Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda: Shodhganga : a reservoir of Indian theses @ INFLIBNET. pp. 411–420.
  13. ^ "The States Reorganisation Act, 1956" (PDF). India Code - Digital Repository of Legislations. 1956-08-31.
  14. ^ Shinde, A.S. (1985). "Chapter 5 Executive-Legislature relationship". Working of the Maharashtra Legislative Assembly (1960-1975) - PhD Thesis. Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar Marathwada University: Shodhganga : a reservoir of Indian theses @ INFLIBNET. pp. 153–154.
  15. ^ "I am just running my own state as best as possible: Devraj Urs". India Today. Retrieved 2018-05-22.
  16. ^ "Statistical Report 1978 Maharashtra Legislative Assembly Elections" (PDF). Election Commission of India. 1978. p. 354.
  17. ^ "Why Sharad Pawar will never ever go back to the Congress". www.dailyo.in. Retrieved 2018-05-22.
  18. ^ "Sharad Pawar | Indian politician". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved 2018-05-22.
  19. ^ Amberish K. Diwanji. "A dummy's guide to President's rule". Rediff.com. 15 March 2005. Retrieved on 3 March 2013.
  20. ^ "Information sought under RTI Act, 2005" (PDF). Ministry of Home Affairs (Government of India). 2014-06-27. p. 7 of 14. Retrieved 2018-05-23.
  21. ^ "Documentation Monthly July 1983 (Research and Reference Election Commission of India)" (PDF). Election Commission of India. pp. 78–79.
  22. ^ "S B Chavan: Headmaster of Indian politics - Times of India". The Times of India. Retrieved 2018-05-21.
  23. ^ "Sushilkumar Shinde is sworn in - Times of India". The Times of India. Retrieved 2018-05-21.
  24. ^ "Maha CM elected unopposed to Legislative Council - Rediff.com India News". www.rediff.com. Retrieved 2018-05-21.
  25. ^ "Chavan elected to Legislative Council". @businessline. Retrieved 2018-05-21.
  26. ^ "Proclamation of President's Rule" (PDF). Government of Maharashtra. 2014-09-28. Retrieved 2018-05-23.
  27. ^ "Proclamation to revoke President's rule" (PDF). Government of Maharashtra. 2014-10-30. Retrieved 2018-05-23.

External links